LAILA SAMUELS

*How has music inspired you?

I think that besides my family and friends,music is the most
important thing in my life. It has always been like that,and I`ve
been singing and writing music from the moment I knew how to talk...
My family went on a lot of cartrips when I was little,and so that was pretty
much my only occupation during these long,..and boring journeys.

*Has music helped you thru a difficult time in your life?

I think we all have moments in our lives when we feel depressed
and doing music has kept me sane more than once. It has given me a chance
to express myself,through my writing. Most of the songs I write are very
personal in one way or another,and though I might not even play them for
others,it helps to get it off my chest.The fact that I could do music has also
inspired me to think that I can do pretty much anything I want,and to always
follow my heart,and to think untraditionally,because you`re forced to look
inside yourself everytime you are being interviewed,or just writing a song.

*Your musical inspirations, favorite musicians/CD's/songs?

I admire the kind of artists that puts their music first.the ones that always
delivers quality and perform in a way that blows you away...
and for me Prince is an artist like that.He is possibly the greatest singer
ever,with his lyrics, vocal range and the heart and feeling that he brings to
every song. I love him. my favourite prince albums are: Gold and Purple rain..
My second favourite is Eminem. His lyrics are brilliant and can never get
enough credit!! I love all his records.
I also love Sheryl Crow`s `Tuesday night music club.,
Mariah Carey`s `Music box.
Some of my other favourites are: Alliyah..Did I spell that one right?, hehe..
Lenny kravitz,shakira,tlc,sugarbabes and many more..

Laila Samuels was born and raised in Oslo, Norway, with her parents and two older sisters. Her mother was a jazz-singer, her sister plays the saxophone and is a conductor, and three of her uncles are musicians and composers, so music was always a natural element in her life.

She started writing songs when she was ten, and sang in different bands from age 13 to 18, when she joined the all-girl-band "The Tuesdays" as their lead singer. They got a record-deal with Polygram worldwide, and was later signed to Arista records in New York, by Clive Davis.

Their catchy single "It`s Up To You" peaked at nr. 55 on the prestigous Billboard Hot 100. They played MTV live, New York, The View, and a number of national TV shows in the US. Went on a two month festival tour with the
"Backstreet Boys", "N' Sync", "Matchbox 20" and many others. They decided to go their separate ways after that.

Laila started writing songs for other artists as well, and soon after she landed a deal with EMI Music Publishing. She is currently working on her first solo-album.
www.laila-samuels.com
welcome.to/tuesdays/

LACY J. DALTON

* Your musical inspirations?

Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Karen Dalton

* Any CD's or songs which are meaningful to you?

Hearing Kris Kristofferson's songs "Why Me, Lord?" and "The Heart" have actually been significantly life-changing for me. The lyric of "Why Me, Lord?" is concerned with gratitude and "The Heart" addresses forgiveness.

Ever wondered what would happen if you could combine Janis Joplin, Bonnie Raitt and Joan Baez into one performer? Ever wondered what equal parts “Country” and “UFO” would create? Look no further than Lacy J. Dalton.

She’s one of the most instantly recognizable voices in music - the woman People magazine called “Country’s Bonnie Raitt.” From the first time Lacy J. Dalton caught the public’s ear, that soulful delivery, full of texture and grit, was a mainstay of country music. When you sit down to listen to a Lacy J. Dalton album, you find yourself pulled in by the very power and heart in this vocalist, because she’s not merely performing a ten-song set, she’s bringing each and every tune to life.

Lacy J. Dalton’s music is a product of her wide-ranging musical tastes. She was born in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania, into a family of music lovers. Her father played a variety of stringed instruments, sang and wrote songs. Her mother played guitar and sang harmony, and her sister was a pianist. Lacy’s early influences were the folk and rock sounds of Bob Dylan and Joan Baez. She’s always been a writer and artist who loved music with a message and lyrics that somehow brought a new awareness to the listener. She retains this love of material with a purpose, and her songwriting reflects that appreciation.

Her latest album “The Last Wild Place” is Lacy’s first move back to her singer-songwriter roots since leaving Nashville, and showcases Lacy’s remarkable voice and writing talents at their finest. The music is heartfelt, acoustic-based, Americana/Folk and ranges from the quiet introspective to the rollicking good time.

Lacy is an innovative and creative artist with a great deal of real-life experience and an earthy honesty that is reflected in her work. Her voice: captivating. Her songs: spellbinding. Does that sound corny? Sure it does! But don’t you owe it to yourself to find out what “a little bit country, a little bit UFO” is all about?

www.lacyjdalton.com/
Lacy J. Dalton merchandise
Let 'em Run Foundation

FELICIA COLLINS

 * How has music inspired you?

By displaying the power to connect to millions of living creatures.

* Your musical inspirations? 
DJ Larry LeVan spinning at the Paradise Garage and live music.

* Favorite CD's, songs, or musicians?

Jef Lee Johnson's Blue cd  and Missing Persons' Sessions M are two favorites.  Some of my truly favorite songs are In The Bottle by Gil Scott-Heron, In The End by Linkin Park, Don't Stop Till You Get Enough by Michael Jackson.

* Has music helped you thru a difficult time in your life?

Through every difficult time.

Philadelphia, late 1960s. A gangly child with thick plaits steadfastly holds onto a broom, as if she were holding onto a guitar, deftly strumming imaginary strings. Secretly, her grandmother, aunts, and uncles watch, as she enthusiastically belts out a tune for an equally fantastic crowd of fans. It would be some time before the child realized her dream of performing before such an audience. However, the reality would far surpass those long ago musings on her grandmother's front porch.

While enrolled in school for graphic design, Felicia Collins began playing with local bands, when she arrived in New York City in the 80s. When playing with a band called The Take, she met and became friends with producer and artist Nile Rogers. So impressed with her guitar talents, he offered Felicia studio work on various projects. His clout for recognizing talent was confirmed, when, just on his word, the Thompson Twins invited the budding musician to play guitar on their upcoming world tour (1985).

In the summer of 1985, Felicia made her live debut with the Thompson Twins at none other than Live Aid!, the famine relief project led by Bob Geldoff, the mastermind who served as the catalyst for "We Are the World." Like that sweltering afternoon, so has been this native New Yorker's career.

The taste of the road was ignited during that maiden tour with the trendy trio across the pond. Soon after that gig, Felicia found herself touring with jazz giant, Al Jarreau, after being featured on his "L is for Lover" album (1986), on a song called Pleasure. While the two genres are assuredly different, Felicia quickly found herself an integral part of the Jarreau set. The loose-lipped, extremely talented performance veteran made Felicia a highlighted part of his stage act.

Recognizing a raw talent in the self-taught musician, Rogers vowed that he and Felicia would one day work on a project together. While still on tour with Jarreau, Nile coerced Felicia into taking a break to record an album with him and Philippe Saisse, in a triad they called Outloud. An album of the same name was released in 1987. At the time, the album received critical praise; however, the record company (Warner Bros.) thought the work was "too artistic." Although the intent was to go back into the studio to record more radio-friendly songs, the project was pulled from stores and shelved--indefinitely. If you search hard enough, you can still find the album in cutout bins and online CD houses.

www.feliciacollins.com/
 

YOUNG DUBLINERS

  • *Your musical inspirations?

    Many. We all have different loves. I lean toward good melodic rock, everything from the Beatles to Radiohead to U2

    * Any CD's or songs which are meaningful to you?

    I love "The bends "by radiohead and the new Coldplay. Also Stereophonics " Performance and Cocktails"

    * How has music inspired you?

    It has been the greatest inspiration, that's why I spend my life in a bus driving around the country day after day playing everynight!!!

    * Has music helped you thru a difficult or traumatic time in your life?

    I'm not sure what I would have done had I not been a musician., When we are playing live I forget all my troubles. I also write a lot of my thoughts into my lyrics so it is a great release.

    Like a raging Irish rain, The Young Dubliners immerse fans in torrents of hard-rocking melody and rhythm on the band’s new OmTown/Higher Octave Music album, Absolutely. The culmination of relentless touring-including a 2001 European tour opening for Jethro Tull, Salt Lake City performances during the 2002 Olympics and countless dates across the U.S. - Absolutely features 12 songs that capture the hellfire intensity and absorbing musical diversity of the Dubliners' acclaimed live shows. This auspicious new album is a lyrical triumph as well, with the Dubliners spinning challenging yet optimistic stories that underscore the complexities of modern life.
  • From the explosive strains of "Salvation" and "Jump in the Sea," to the mug-hoisting balladry of "Scream" and the Dubliners' spirited interpretation of Face's 1973 classic "Ooh La La," Absolutely lives up to its enthusiastic title.

    "It really is a reflection of the band," says Dubliners founding member and frontman Keith Roberts, describing Absolutely. "It's got the sense of humor of the band, along with the balls-y lyrics that maybe in the past I couldn't bring myself to write. You put it all together and you get this good-feeling, upbeat album. That's why we titled the album like we did. This record is the Young Dubliners, absolutely."

    Its emphatic title aside, Absolutely symbolizes a homecoming of sorts for Roberts and bandmates Bob Boulding (lead guitar), Bren Holmes (bass) and David Ingraham (drums). The album marks the return of Chas Waltz, the former Dubliner whose multi-tasking skills are evident on fiddle, keyboards, harmonica, mandolin and backing vocals. "My leaving had more to do with previous obligations than with creative differences," Waltz explains. "When Keith asked if I was interested in coming back, I was ready to get back to being part of a band and touring again."

    That renewed sense of creative vigor comes across loud and clear on Absolutely. The locomotive rhythms that fuel "Salvation," "Come On" and "Brown Dog" are complemented by The Dubs' distinct fusion of hard-luck lyricism and silver-lined sentimentality.

    Like a raging Irish rain, The Young Dubliners immerse fans in torrents of hard-rocking melody and rhythm on the band’s new OmTown/Higher Octave Music album, Absolutely. The culmination of relentless touring-including a 2001 European tour opening for Jethro Tull, Salt Lake City performances during the 2002 Olympics and countless dates across the U.S. - Absolutely features 12 songs that capture the hellfire intensity and absorbing musical diversity of the Dubliners' acclaimed live shows. This auspicious new album is a lyrical triumph as well, with the Dubliners spinning challenging yet optimistic stories that underscore the complexities of modern life.

    From the explosive strains of "Salvation" and "Jump in the Sea," to the mug-hoisting balladry of "Scream" and the Dubliners' spirited interpretation of Face's 1973 classic "Ooh La La," Absolutely lives up to its enthusiastic title.

    "It really is a reflection of the band," says Dubliners founding member and frontman Keith Roberts, describing Absolutely. "It's got the sense of humor of the band, along with the balls-y lyrics that maybe in the past I couldn't bring myself to write. You put it all together and you get this good-feeling, upbeat album. That's why we titled the album like we did. This record is the Young Dubliners, absolutely."

    Its emphatic title aside, Absolutely symbolizes a homecoming of sorts for Roberts and bandmates Bob Boulding (lead guitar), Bren Holmes (bass) and David Ingraham (drums). The album marks the return of Chas Waltz, the former Dubliner whose multi-tasking skills are evident on fiddle, keyboards, harmonica, mandolin and backing vocals. "My leaving had more to do with previous obligations than with creative differences," Waltz explains. "When Keith asked if I was interested in coming back, I was ready to get back to being part of a band and touring again."

    That renewed sense of creative vigor comes across loud and clear on Absolutely. The locomotive rhythms that fuel "Salvation," "Come On" and "Brown Dog" are complemented by The Dubs' distinct fusion of hard-luck lyricism and silver-lined sentimentality. Closer inspection reveals that the deceptively titled "Scream" is actually a ballad that urges listeners to release their frustrations. On the Beatlesque "Name," Roberts and company tell the story of a husband struggling to make amends for his neglectful behavior, while tracks like "Low" and "Fan" address more complex issues and are defined by a straight-faced determination. Other songs such as "Knickers" and the uproarious "Jump in the Sea," possess the bawdy candor of an after-hours pub sing-along in which the Dubs’ combine squalling rock guitars with funky urban rhythms and forthright lyrics.

    The Dubs' sense of humor is evident in song titles like the instrumental "Unreel"-a tongue-in-cheek reference to the barnstorming "reels" that are Irish tradition. Song for song, Absolutely possesses the bittersweet savor of real life.

    "I've noticed recently that I can't write a song about how miserable life is without supplying some way out," Roberts says, laughing. "Personally speaking, I've been lucky that way. I've somehow come out of the bad times with some hope. I guess one could say this album is ultimately about hope: from hoping you'll overcome tragedy, to hoping you get the girl.

    Roberts credits producer John Wooler for capturing the Dubliners' fiery performing essence. An expatriate Scot, Wooler is a former Virgin Records executive who has worked in an A&R capacity with roots-folk legends John Lee Hooker, Willie Nelson, The Staple Singers and Steve Forbert. Wooler's insistence on raw studio performance suited the Dubliners to a tee. "The goal was to capture the band's live energy, but to also have a production vibe that would stand up to radio," Wooler says. "It was only a matter of getting the band in a decent-sized room and trying to cut the tracks live. The Dubliners have a great deal of personality in their sound, and all I had to do was capture that. It worked really well."

    "We couldn't have asked for a better scenario," Roberts says of Wooler, engineer Sally Browder and their no-frills production approach. "We went in and played straight to tape. And we were so rehearsed and tight from touring that we played live with minimal overdubs. For the first time I think we really accurately captured what we sound like live."

    Roberts and his confederates know a thing or two about optimism-their virtuosic talents notwithstanding, the band has become a top concert attraction through sheer perseverance. The Young Dubliners came together in the early 90s when Roberts decided to learn some Irish ballads with the thought of starting a band. Assembling a rag-tag team of Irish transplants and like-minded American rockers, The Young Dubliners grew into a pugnacious music machine. An EP "Rocky Road" (1994), a studio album "Breathe" (1995) and a live collection "Alive, Alive O" (1998) were released to critical acclaim, while the band's live performances continue to convert fans worldwide.

    Building a fervent fan base comparable to that of "jam band" rockers like Phish and Dave Matthews Band, The Young Dubliners became notorious for the whirling "jig pits" that erupted at their shows. In Los Angeles alone, the Dubliners have sold out more than 40 consecutive gigs at the renowned House of Blues.

    In 2000, The Dubliners released Red, their OmTown/Higher Octave Music debut. Taking to the road in support of the album, the band played more than 500 shows where they honed their performances to a fine edge. Now, with its well-crafted songs, hard-hitting performances and earnest lyrics, Absolutely poises The Young Dubliners for international success.

    "I really believe it has all been leading up to this record," says Keith Roberts. "In the past it's always been me or somebody else writing the songs alone, whereas this album is truly a collaborative effort, in that everybody contributed. In fact, this is the first album ever to say 'all songs written by The Young Dubliners.' That's made everyone very excited about the band's future prospects, and our shared success. Without a doubt, this is the best chemistry this band has ever had."

    Closer inspection reveals that the deceptively titled "Scream" is actually a ballad that urges listeners to release their frustrations. On the Beatlesque "Name," Roberts and company tell the story of a husband struggling to make amends for his neglectful behavior, while tracks like "Low" and "Fan" address more complex issues and are defined by a straight-faced determination. Other songs such as "Knickers" and the uproarious "Jump in the Sea," possess the bawdy candor of an after-hours pub sing-along in which the Dubs’ combine squalling rock guitars with funky urban rhythms and forthright lyrics.

    The Dubs' sense of humor is evident in song titles like the instrumental "Unreel"-a tongue-in-cheek reference to the barnstorming "reels" that are Irish tradition. Song for song, Absolutely possesses the bittersweet savor of real life.

    "I've noticed recently that I can't write a song about how miserable life is without supplying some way out," Roberts says, laughing. "Personally speaking, I've been lucky that way. I've somehow come out of the bad times with some hope. I guess one could say this album is ultimately about hope: from hoping you'll overcome tragedy, to hoping you get the girl.

    Roberts credits producer John Wooler for capturing the Dubliners' fiery performing essence. An expatriate Scot, Wooler is a former Virgin Records executive who has worked in an A&R capacity with roots-folk legends John Lee Hooker, Willie Nelson, The Staple Singers and Steve Forbert. Wooler's insistence on raw studio performance suited the Dubliners to a tee. "The goal was to capture the band's live energy, but to also have a production vibe that would stand up to radio," Wooler says. "It was only a matter of getting the band in a decent-sized room and trying to cut the tracks live. The Dubliners have a great deal of personality in their sound, and all I had to do was capture that. It worked really well."

    "We couldn't have asked for a better scenario," Roberts says of Wooler, engineer Sally Browder and their no-frills production approach. "We went in and played straight to tape. And we were so rehearsed and tight from touring that we played live with minimal overdubs. For the first time I think we really accurately captured what we sound like live."

    Roberts and his confederates know a thing or two about optimism-their virtuosic talents notwithstanding, the band has become a top concert attraction through sheer perseverance. The Young Dubliners came together in the early 90s when Roberts decided to learn some Irish ballads with the thought of starting a band. Assembling a rag-tag team of Irish transplants and like-minded American rockers, The Young Dubliners grew into a pugnacious music machine. An EP "Rocky Road" (1994), a studio album "Breathe" (1995) and a live collection "Alive, Alive O" (1998) were released to critical acclaim, while the band's live performances continue to convert fans worldwide.

    Building a fervent fan base comparable to that of "jam band" rockers like Phish and Dave Matthews Band, The Young Dubliners became notorious for the whirling "jig pits" that erupted at their shows. In Los Angeles alone, the Dubliners have sold out more than 40 consecutive gigs at the renowned House of Blues.

    In 2000, The Dubliners released Red, their OmTown/Higher Octave Music debut. Taking to the road in support of the album, the band played more than 500 shows where they honed their performances to a fine edge. Now, with its well-crafted songs, hard-hitting performances and earnest lyrics, Absolutely poises The Young Dubliners for international success.

    "I really believe it has all been leading up to this record," says Keith Roberts. "In the past it's always been me or somebody else writing the songs alone, whereas this album is truly a collaborative effort, in that everybody contributed. In fact, this is the first album ever to say 'all songs written by The Young Dubliners.' That's made everyone very excited about the band's future prospects, and our shared success. Without a doubt, this is the best chemistry this band has ever had."
    www.youngdubliners.com/
    Young Dubliners store

MIKE BOTTS

Musical influences?

I'd have to say that my influences were very eclectic. I listened to everything and still do. I find great ideas and inspiration in Jazz, Classical, Pop/Rock, Blues and R&B. All these influences came in handy when I started doing work as a session musician. I was able to play in any number of genres with great confidence, having already familiarized with the musical form.

It was the same way for drummers. I listened to as many as possible and found so many unique styles of drumming. This was a great source of material that helped me form my own sound and style over the years

Any CD's or songs that are meaningful to me?

There are too many to mention.

How has music inspired me?

I always knew I would be a musician, more specifically, a drummer. Music has been the strongest influence of my life and has inspired me even in the face of great odds and adversity.
Discuss your current CD.

My solo CD, "Adults Only", was a labor of love and a collection of songs I had written during the 4 or 5 years before the recording. I had immense help and encouragement from some wonderful friends and musicians. It is as honest as I can be artistically speaking and I'm quite proud of the end result. I'm sure you can hear many influences in the performances on the CD.

I was born in Oakland, California, then raised for my first six years in the nearby town of Antioch and at age seven the Botts family moved to Sacramento. This is where my fascination with music and drums started to become a "hands on" reality, thanks to a school system that had a music department and for the ecouragement and guidance I received from a grumpy but caring old music instructor named Mr. Wolfe. While I continued my formal music education in school, my informal education came mainly from the local radio stations. By the time I was starting high school, I was also starting to play gigs around town with local bands and had developed a particularly strong interest in Jazz and Rhythm & Blues.

It was during this period that I was listening to everything from Miles Davis and John Coltrane to Little Richard and Fats Domino. By the time I had entered college I had become a "large fish in a small pond", so to speak. It afforded me some great playing opportunities such as working for a short time with Jazz greats like guitarist, Wes Montgomery and organist, Jimmy Smith, as well as being first call on some of the best gigs in town. But deep down I knew that if I was going to continue to grow and find new musical horizons I would have to leave Sacramento.

It was during my second year of college that I was offered a few casual summer gigs with a group based out of Los Angeles called the Travelers Three. A few months later they called me from Canada to say they were going Electric, they needed a drummer and offered the job to me. We all got along great. I enjoyed the music and besides, it was my ticket to Los Angeles and The Road, so of course I accepted. Being in L.A. soon gave me the opportunity to break in to recording.

With some networking and recommendations by a few close friends, I was able to do more and more session work in between the college and club tours with the Travelers Three. As the group started fading, my career as a session player started getting brighter. In fact, it was at a recording session for the Travelers Three that I first met David Gates. David had been brought in to produce some recordings of us for Capitol records. The record company passed, the group broke up but I continued to run into David occasionally in various recording sessions around the city.

Over the next couple of years, outside of being a member of an ill fated group called Joshua Fox, I pretty much focused my energy on developing a career as a studio musician. It was during this time that I got a call to do a session with Bill Medley and ended up working with him for the next two years. So, between touring with Medley and all of the session work, I was staying very busy. And just when I thought my career had stabilized and I was really locked in, I got a call from David Gates. David wanted me to come by to meet the other guys in BREAD and hear their first album. Having been soured by previous group ventures, I have to admit I was less than enthusiastic. But after hearing the music and meeting Jimmy and Rob, I agreed to become a member. After all, even if the group failed I always had the studios and Bill Medley to fall back on.

Well, little did I realize what was about to happen. I was able to balance BREAD, Bill Medley and recording sessions pretty well, at least for awhile. Then while I was doing a series of concerts in Hawaii with Medley, I got another call from David. He had called to tell me that "Make it With You", was climbing up the charts and we had a hit on our hands. At that point I knew I had to make a choice. So, with the understanding and encouragement of Bill Medley, I flew back to L.A. to be a full time member of BREAD.

BREAD soon became the all consuming part of our professional lives. We were either in the studio or on the road from 1970 to May of 1973. That's when the group decided to take a hiatus from all the pressure and pursue some individual projects and goals. It was shortly after the breakup in 1973 that I started working with Linda Ronstadt. I recorded and toured with Linda for about two and a half years. It was an absolute ball working with Ronstadt and what a band !! Fortunately, I was still able to balance my studio work and my obligations to Linda until I got another call from David in 1976. David called to tell me that he, Jimmy Griffin and Larry Knechtel had been discussing a possible reunion. Well, within weeks of David’s call, I had sadly given notice to Linda Ronstadt and was back in the studio with BREAD cutting tracks for the Lost Without Your Love album.

The band continued to tour through 1978 but unfortunately some irreconcilable differences within the group eventually involved all of us in litigation and caused the group to disband once again. Over the next few years I continued doing studio work with various artists. At this time, I also began trying to develop my production and songwriting abilities with some measure of success. Outside of a short tour of the U.K. with David in 1980, I devoted most of my time to recording and developing my talents as a musician, writer and producer.

By 1982, I was feeling that old urge to hit the road again . So when Karla Bonoff invited me to join her band for a summer tour with James Taylor, I gladly accepted. After that I proceeded to work with Karla on and off for the next couple of years. In late 1983 I formed a group with Andrew Gold. I first met Andrew while working with Linda Ronstadt back in 1974. Although we had all the ingredients for commercial success, the group (Houdini) became a victim of what I call a spontaneous internal combustion, which was ignited by the third member of the group. Unfortunately, It never got off the launch pad. Oh well, Se la vie!

By 1985 drum machines and computers had been introduced to the music scene. It soon became evident that this was not a fad or novelty and that they would be incorporated into all areas of music. Consequently, I had to become a computer programmer as well as a drummer. Becoming at least somewhat computer literate not only helped me in studio work but was also an enormous help in developing my songwriting and production abilities over the next few years. From 1985 through 1990 I was almost totally involved in recording as a player, singer, writer, and producer. The only exception was a short tour to Japan with Richard Carpenter in 1989. But other than that, I stayed in L.A. and concentrated on expanding my talents and abilities in other areas of music including some video production and direction.

In the summer of 1991 I got an opportunity to tour and record with Dan Fogelberg. After the previous five years, the gypsy in me was more than ready to start touring again. Because Dan usually goes out on tour only once or twice a year, it was, once again, easy for me to balance touring with session work and other projects I was involved in.

That brings us to '96'. I had just released "Double Platinum Drums", my first CD rom of drum samples and loops, I'd started working on a recording project for the NBA and was waiting to get a phone call from Dan Fogelberg regarding a possible tour. Well, I got a phone call but it wasn't from Dan. It was from a man named Selwyn Miller, who very politely informed me that he was representing, guess who? That's right, DAVID GATES! And that became the beginning of an extensive two year world tour to celebrate the group's twenty-fifth anniversary.

After completing the world tour with BREAD, I began diligently working on my first solo CD effort, "Adults Only". Although it took quite a while to complete, it's now finally available and I couldn't be happier or more satisfied with the results. I had the invaluable help of some of the best musicians and engineers around and they were indispensable in helping me turn my musical vision into a reality. The whole "Adults Only" CD project became a wonderful personal experience and a genuine labor of love. I hope you enjoy it as well.

This was followed by the great 'Na Kama Hele' (the Travelers) "Slack Key"project which was just plain fun. The original members of the 'Travelers 3' reunited along with Rick Cunha to record two CD's, "Ki Ho `Alu Journey" and "The One They Call Hawaii". They're a collection of some of the great classic songs of Hawaii done in the traditional style of "Slack Key" guitar. You can check out both CD's while sipping your Mai-Tai at www.nakamahele.com.

I've most recently been back working with Dan Fogelberg again and having a great time. Dan has always put together excellent bands and this last one was one of the best. We completed an extensive U.S. tour during the summer of '03 which I later chronicled in my tour journal. A couple of months later the tour was followed by a special taped "live" performance with Dan and the band for the Chicago based PBS music series, "Soundstage". I believe a DVD of the show will be available after it airs this fall. Believe me! This is a must have item for any Dan Fogelberg Fans.

Right now, I'm back in L.A. doing studio work, writing new material and waiting for a tour bus to come along and take me on another great adventure on the road.
www.mikebotts.com/

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